My research

Research interests

A display of a pp → tt → bb\mu\tau event in ATLAS in 2011.

A display of a ppttbbμτ event in ATLAS in 2011.

Many theories of physics beyond the Standard Model have revolutionary implications for the concepts of symmetry and space-time, and for our understanding of the early universe.

Searching for new physics in collider data involves detecting rare events among many, requiring big data reductions, data-driven background modeling, and severe statistical hypothesis testing.

A figure I drew with Kyle Cranmer of the big-picture of the flow of ATLAS data.

A figure I drew with Kyle Cranmer of the big-picture of the flow of ATLAS data.

My research has primarily focused on supporting and optimizing the reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, and searching for exotic new physics in ditau and diphoton events, including for signs of grand unified theories and supersymmetry.

More recently, my research has transitioned to using deep learning techniques for particle physics reconstruction and other classification problems.

Current projects I am focused on

Previous focuses

Curriculum Vitae

Thesis

My graduate research in particle physics was on the reconstruction and identification of hadronic tau decays with the ATLAS experiment, measuring the Z→ττ production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV, and searching for new physics in high-mass ditau events.

        Download my thesis here


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